The Royal Institution

Playing the interactive elements game in the Faraday Exhibition
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For over 200 years, the RI has been ‘diffusing science for the common purposes of life’.

Venue Type:

Museum, Science centre

Opening hours

Mon-Fri 09.00-21.00
(reception desk 09.00-18.00)

Closed: 23rd Dec-2nd Jan & bank holidays

Admission charges

Admission to building/exhibition: Free

Admission charge for some events including:
Public Lectures
Standard: £10.00
Concession: £7.00
Associate: £5.00
Member/Faraday: Free

Additional info

The Archive Reading Room is open to the public by appointment, Mon-Wed, 10.00-13.00 and 14.00-17.00.

Includes the original apparatus and papers of many of those who have researched, lectured and lived at the Royal Institution including Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday, John Tyndall, James Dewar, William Bragg, Lawrence Bragg and George Porter. The collection also includes important collections of iconographical material in various media, scientific instruments, as well as a large administrative archive, covering all aspects of the work of the Royal Institution.

Collection details

Science and Technology, Natural Sciences, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Michael Faraday
  • Induction Ring
  • Volta's Battery
  • Humphry Davy
  • Davy Lamp
  • Count Rumford
  • James Dewar
  • Dewar Flask
  • John Tyndall
  • William Henry Bragg
  • William Lawrence Bragg
  • X-ray Spectrometer
  • Lysozyme
  • Laboratory
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
  Computed tomography of the human brain

Consciousness: The underlying neuroscience

  • 27 May 2016 7:45-9:15pm

Consciousness is, for each of us, the presence of a world. But how do rich multisensory experiences, the senses of self and body, and volition emerge from the joint activity of billions of neurons? Once the province just of philosophy and theology, the neuroscience of consciousness has emerged as a one of the great scientific challenges for this century.

Join Anil Seth for an insight into the state-of-the-art research in the new science of consciousness. Distinguishing between conscious level, conscious content and conscious self, he will describe how new experiments are shedding light on the underlying neural mechanisms in normal life as well as in neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£18

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-consciousness-the-underlying-neuroscience

Four aces in a hand

The perfect bet: How science and maths are taking the luck out of gambling

  • 1 June 2016 7-8:30pm

From the statisticians forecasting sports scores to the intelligent bots beating human poker players, Adam Kucharski traces the scientific origins of the world's best gambling strategies. Spanning mathematics, psychology, economics and physics, he reveals the long and tangled history between betting and science, and explains how gambling shaped everything from probability to game theory, and chaos theory to artificial intelligence.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 14-15
  • 16-17

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-the-perfect-bet

Axolotl

Restless creatures

  • 2 June 2016 6-7:15pm

Why are there no flying monkeys but plenty of flying dinosaurs? Why are there no natural wheels on Earth? And how can a human outrun an antelope? Join zoologist Matt Wilkinson on a whistle-stop tour of the evolution of moving around, and find out how our ancestors became two-legged, why we have opposable thumbs, backbones and brains, how even trees are obsessed with movement, and how going from place to place has dominated the four-billion-year history of life.

Suitable for

  • 11-13
  • 14-15
  • 7-10
  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-restless-creatures

Picture of brain with raindrops in

Explore your mind

  • 10 June 2016 6-7:15pm

Are you willing to venture into the depths of your mind? Cambridge neuroscientist, Hannah Critchlow, will shock your senses, read your brainwaves and explore how neuroscience shapes our world.

Suitable for

  • 7-10
  • 11-13
  • 14-15
  • Any age

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-explore-your-mind

Artist impression of Curiosity approaching Mars

Mars exploration: Curiosity and beyond

  • 16 June 2016 7-8:30pm

In August of 2012 NASA landed the largest and most capable robotic geologist in history, on the surface of Mars. The Curiosity Rover is on a journey to determine past and present habitability of the Red Planet. Anita Sengupta is one of the lead NASA engineers who developed the system to land Curiosity. She will describe the challenges of landing on Mars and what is over the horizon on our human journey to Mars.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-mars-exploration-curiosity-and-beyond

ATLAS event

Ministry of sense: Hunting the Higgs

  • 17 June 2016 6-7:15pm

The discovery of the Higgs Boson was one of the greatest and most exciting discoveries of science – could you have made it too? Join the hunt for the higgs in this highly interactive comedy show where you the public are in charge of the Large Hadron Collider. Using a smartphone or tablet you will have direct access to LHC data, and complete interactive games to help solve problems and analyse data. A unique, entertaining, and very hands-on show.

Please bring a charged smartphone or tablet with you!

Suitable for

  • 11-13
  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-ministry-of-sense-hunting-the-higgs

Kyoto University accelerator

Accelerators reimagined

  • 24 June 2016 7:50-9:15pm

Particle accelerators aren't just for studying particle physics. They have an immense range of applications, from treating cancer to purifying drinking water. Suzie Sheehy will show us how accelerators actually work, highlight her research controlling high power proton beams and imagine what they may be capable of in the future.

About the speaker
Suzie Sheehy is an Accelerator Physicist at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the areas of particle physics, accelerator physics and their applications including medical and energy applications.
She is also heavily involved in science outreach and often appears in the media to explain the work of particle physicists and how accelerators work.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£18

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/june/public-accelerators-reimagined

The Royal Institution
The Royal Institution of Great Britain
21 Albemarle Street
Mayfair
London
Greater London
W1S 4BS
England

Website

www.rigb.org

E-mail

ri@ri.ac.uk

Telephone

020 7409 2992

Fax

+44 (0) 20 7670 2920

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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