The Royal Institution

Playing the interactive elements game in the Faraday Exhibition
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For over 200 years, the RI has been ‘diffusing science for the common purposes of life’.

Venue Type:

Museum, Science centre

Opening hours

Mon-Fri 09.00-21.00
(reception desk 09.00-18.00)

Closed: 23rd Dec-2nd Jan & bank holidays

Admission charges

Admission to building/exhibition: Free

Admission charge for some events including:
Public Lectures
Standard: £10.00
Concession: £7.00
Associate: £5.00
Member/Faraday: Free

Additional info

The Archive Reading Room is open to the public by appointment, Mon-Wed, 10.00-13.00 and 14.00-17.00.

Includes the original apparatus and papers of many of those who have researched, lectured and lived at the Royal Institution including Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday, John Tyndall, James Dewar, William Bragg, Lawrence Bragg and George Porter. The collection also includes important collections of iconographical material in various media, scientific instruments, as well as a large administrative archive, covering all aspects of the work of the Royal Institution.

Collection details

Science and Technology, Natural Sciences, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Michael Faraday
  • Induction Ring
  • Volta's Battery
  • Humphry Davy
  • Davy Lamp
  • Count Rumford
  • James Dewar
  • Dewar Flask
  • John Tyndall
  • William Henry Bragg
  • William Lawrence Bragg
  • X-ray Spectrometer
  • Lysozyme
  • Laboratory
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Pong graphic

WiFi Wars: Debug

  • 6 May 2016 7-8:30pm *on now

Future-tech videogaming comedy show WiFi Wars returns to the Ri for another fun development night, in advance of their July show in the main theatre. Be the first people ever to try their new toys! Sells out - book quickly! Hosted by Steve McNeil (Videogame Nation, Dara O’Briain’s Go 8 Bit). Bring a charged smartphone!

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 11-13
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-wifi-wars-debug

Sound wave visualisation

The voices within

  • 9 May 2016 7-8:30pm

Close your eyes and have a thought. Now what was it like to think that thought? What we usually call 'thinking' is often a kind of speaking by, and a listening to, the multiple voices of our consciousness. Psychologist and writer Charles Fernyhough will tell stories of everyone from children to people who hear voices and will reveal how our inner voices play a vital part in our thinking.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-the-voices-within

  Ascent of the Monsieur Bouclé's Montgolfier Balloon in the Gardens of Aranjuez by Antonio Carnicero

No need for geniuses

  • 11 May 2016 7-8:30pm

Paris at the time of the French Revolution was the world capital of science. In this dazzling new insight into the City of Light, Steve Jones takes a sideways look at its history, its revolutionary science and the scholars who laid the foundations, in the age of the guillotine.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-no-need-for-geniuses

Proboscis monkeys

The ugly animal roadshow

  • 13 May 2016 6-7:15pm

The Ugly Animal Preservation Society, celebrates and explores the incredible biology of the animal kingdom’s most monstrous. What adaptations make them amazing? How did such hideous creatures evolve in the first place? Featuring videos, demos and audience participation, Simon Watt will showcase the ugliest of the animal kingdom that he wants us all to be fighting for.

Suitable for

  • 11-13
  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-the-ugly-animal-roadshow

'BUILD YOUR OWN TELEVISION RECEIVER.' Science and Invention magazine cover, November 1928

Family Fun Day: Imaginative inventions

  • 15 May 2016 11am-4pm

From the ancient Greeks to the modern day, inventions have shaped the way society has grown and the world has progressed, with many of these important developments invented right here at the Ri. Hear from Adam Hart-Davis, get hands-on, see demos, and explore the amazing inventions that have shaped our modern world.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£14 adult
£7 child

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-family-fun-day--imaginative-inventions

Visualisation of DNA helix and proteins involved in gene expression

Epigenetic inheritance and parental origin effects

  • 18 May 2016 7-8:30pm

What is epigenetic inheritance and why is it important? And why would it matter which parent you inherited a particular gene from? Join epigeneticist Anne Ferguson-Smith to learn the implications of parental origin for development, metabolism and the brain.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-epigenetic-inheritance-and-parental-origin-effects

Numerical simulation of two merging black holes performed by the Albert Einstein Institute in Germany showing gravitational waves.

Catching gravitational waves: a new discovery and a new astronomy

  • 19 May 2016 7-8:30pm

A century ago, Albert Einstein realised that in his new model for space and time in our Universe (his 'General Theory of Relativity'), space could be stretching and squashing in response to the motion of objects. These ripples in space-time - 'Gravitational waves' - are produced by some of the most energetic and dramatic phenomena in our universe, including black holes, neutron stars and supernovae.

Close to 100 years after the prediction of the existence of gravitational waves, the advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected such signals for the first time, starting a new era in astronomy. Sheila Rowan will explain the nature of gravitational waves, describe what sources out in the Universe can produce them, explain how they are detected and what the future of this new era in astronomy might look like.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£14

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-catching-gravitational-waves-a-new-discovery-and-a-new-astronomy

  Computed tomography of the human brain

Consciousness: The underlying neuroscience

  • 27 May 2016 7:45-9:15pm

Consciousness is, for each of us, the presence of a world. But how do rich multisensory experiences, the senses of self and body, and volition emerge from the joint activity of billions of neurons? Once the province just of philosophy and theology, the neuroscience of consciousness has emerged as a one of the great scientific challenges for this century.

Join Anil Seth for an insight into the state-of-the-art research in the new science of consciousness. Distinguishing between conscious level, conscious content and conscious self, he will describe how new experiments are shedding light on the underlying neural mechanisms in normal life as well as in neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£18

Website

http://www.rigb.org/whats-on/events-2016/may/public-consciousness-the-underlying-neuroscience

The Royal Institution
The Royal Institution of Great Britain
21 Albemarle Street
Mayfair
London
Greater London
W1S 4BS
England

Website

www.rigb.org

E-mail

ri@ri.ac.uk

Telephone

020 7409 2992

Fax

+44 (0) 20 7670 2920

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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