The Royal Institution

Playing the interactive elements game in the Faraday Exhibition
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For over 200 years, the RI has been ‘diffusing science for the common purposes of life’.

Venue Type:

Museum, Science centre

Opening hours

Mon-Fri 09.00-21.00
(reception desk 09.00-18.00)

Closed: 23rd Dec-2nd Jan & bank holidays

Admission charges

Admission to building/exhibition: Free

Admission charge for some events including:
Public Lectures
Standard: £10.00
Concession: £7.00
Associate: £5.00
Member/Faraday: Free

Additional info

The Archive Reading Room is open to the public by appointment, Mon-Wed, 10.00-13.00 and 14.00-17.00.

Includes the original apparatus and papers of many of those who have researched, lectured and lived at the Royal Institution including Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday, John Tyndall, James Dewar, William Bragg, Lawrence Bragg and George Porter. The collection also includes important collections of iconographical material in various media, scientific instruments, as well as a large administrative archive, covering all aspects of the work of the Royal Institution.

Collection details

Science and Technology, Natural Sciences, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Michael Faraday
  • Induction Ring
  • Volta's Battery
  • Humphry Davy
  • Davy Lamp
  • Count Rumford
  • James Dewar
  • Dewar Flask
  • John Tyndall
  • William Henry Bragg
  • William Lawrence Bragg
  • X-ray Spectrometer
  • Lysozyme
  • Laboratory

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Water ripples

Water - the strangest molecule in the Universe

  • 28 May 2015 7-9pm *on now

Water is the most every day of substances, but on closer examination it also one of the strangest. To celebrate the launch of his latest book, Alok Jha will tell the story of this fascinating molecule which takes us back to the beginning of the Universe.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£12 Standard
£8 Concession

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/may/public-water--the-strangest-molecule-in-the-universe

Elizabeth Stokoe head shot

The interactional ‘nudge’: Talking about talk from the mundane to the dramatic

  • 29 May 2015 7:50-9:15pm

First dates, police interviews, doctor-patient communication and commercial sales – they are all driven by talk. And an understanding of how talk works is crucial for success. Elizabeth Stokoe explains how conversation analysis works to provide a scientific understanding of talk as it unfolds in mundane as well as dramatic settings.

Rather than being messy and disorderly, she shows that talk is in fact organised systematically. Like behavioural change in ‘nudge’ theory, she also shows how small variations in what we say impacts on what others say and do next. Finally, she will demonstrate how her research findings can underpin communication training – in contrast to role-play and simulation – and upended common assumptions about how talk works.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 14-15
  • 16-17

Admission

£17 Standard

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/may/public-the-interactional-nudge-talking-about-talk-from-the-mundane-to-the-dramat

Making phlogiston

If you can spray phlogiston, is it real?

  • 1 June 2015 7-8:30pm

In the first of three guest-curated talks by Michela Massimi, Hasok Chang discusses how we should understand cases from the history of science in which scientists were confident that they were directly manipulating entities which modern science considers nonexistent. The chemistry of “phlogiston” from the 18th century provides an excellent example.

About the speaker

Hasok Chang is Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, particularly focussing on the history and philosophy of chemistry and physics from the 18th century onward as well as the philosophy of scientific practice.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£12

Jordan Ellenberg

How not to be wrong: The power of mathematical thinking

  • 1 June 2015 7-8:30pm

The maths we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. Jordan Ellenberg will show us how wrong this view is: Maths touches everything we do, allowing us to see the hidden structures beneath the messy and chaotic surface of our daily lives. Maths is the a science of not being wrong, worked out through centuries of hard work and argument.

About the speaker

Jordan Ellenberg is a professor of Mathematics at University of Wisconsin, and the 'Do the Math' columnist at Slate. His book 'How not to be wrong: The hidden mathematics of everyday life' will be published in June.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£12

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/june/public-how-not-to-be-wrong-the-power-of-mathematical-thinking

Higgs event

Big bucks for big bosons: Should we still be paying for the Large Hadron Collider?

  • 2 June 2015 7-8:30pm

Victoria Martin, leader of the Higgs boson research team at the University of Edinburgh, will discuss the Large Hadron Collider, the Higgs boson and what's the point of continuing to run the world's largest and most expensive experiment for the next decade. This is the second of three guest-curated talks by Michela Massimi.

About the speaker

Victoria Martin is a reader in particle physics at the University of Edinburgh. She currently works on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

Series
This event is part of a series of talks exploring the laws of nature in the physical and the life sciences, curated by Michela Massimi. She is an expert in Kant, and the intersection between contemporary philosophical problems and scientific practice. Each event is stand-alone so you can attend as many as you wish.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£12

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/june/public-big-bucks-for-big-bosons-should-we-still-be-paying-for-the-large-hadron-c

Forest of synthetic pyramidal dendrites grown using Cajal's laws of neuronal branching

Designing nature

  • 3 June 2015 7-8:30pm

Biology appears to be less law-like than its sister sciences, but could we change this with design? Jane Calvert and Alistair Elfick discuss synthetic biology, an emergent discipline that aims to rationally design and fabricate biological devices; and how applying engineering principles to living systems might help us harness the power of the natural world. This is the final of three guest-curated talks by Michela Massimi.

About the speakers

Jane Calvert is a reader in Science Technology and Innovation Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research focuses on sociology of the life sciences, and particularly on attempts to engineer living things in the emerging field of synthetic biology.

Alistair Elfick is professor in the synthetic and systems biology group of the University of Edinburgh. He is Personal Chair in Synthetic Biological Engineering.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

£12

Wind farm

Sustainable energy without the hot air

  • 9 June 2015 7-8:30pm

If you’ve ever wondered how much energy we use, and where it comes but are fed up with all the hot air and ‘greenwash’, this is the event for you. David Mackay will cut through all the statements from the media, government and lobbies of all sides to give you the numbers and the facts you need, in bite-sized chunks.

About the speaker

David MacKay is Professor of Engineering at the University of Cambridge, having previously been Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics. He started out with a degree in Experimental and Theoretical Physics from Trinity College and went on to gain a PhD. in Computation and Neural Systems. He was the Chief Scientific Adviser to the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) from 2009 - 2014.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 14-15
  • 16-17

Admission

£12

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/june/public-sustainable-energy-without-the-hot-air

Human embryonic stem cells, in blue

The story of life

  • 11 June 2015 7-8:30pm

How was the code of DNA cracked? How did it confirm the theory of evolution? And why did life evolve the way it did? To celebrate their ground-breaking new books, Matthew Cobb and Nick Lane will come together to unravel the tangled story of DNA and answer the vital question: why are we as we are, and why are we here at all?

About the speakers

Nick Lane is an evolutionary biochemist in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London. His work focuses on the origin of life, and the origin and evolution of eukaryotes. He is also author of prize-winning popular science books, including 'Life ascending'.

Matthew Cobb is Professor of Zoology and a senior lecturer in animal behaviour at the University of Manchester. After spending some time researching humans at the institute of psychiatry, a lot of his work now investigates insect behaviour and its evolutionary and genetic basis, particularly smell.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£12

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/june/public-the-story-of-life

Marty Jopson with his hair on end

Zap, crackle and pop!

  • 18 June 2015 6-7:15pm

Join Dr Marty Jopson, the BBC One Show’s resident scientist as he takes a sparky journey through the story of electricity. Do you know the difference between current and voltage? With the aid of the audience, Marty will explain. From the Ancient Greeks, through Faraday’s genius, this show aims to put the awesome back into electricity. You may think we have electricity tamed, but are you sure? A show chock full of demonstrations and a plucked chicken. Expect an electrifying performance.

About the speaker

Marty Jopson is a science TV presenter, live show performer, writer and strange prop builder. He is most famous from the BBC's The One Show, on which he has reported on the mathematical formula, Benford’s Law, the origins of the seismograph, the sound mirrors of Denge, the ban on lead in petrol, and the invention of lava lamps.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£12

Modern engineering building

Re-engineering our spaces

  • 26 June 2015 7:50-9:15pm

The way we live our lives is challenging us to think of new ways of engineering our built environment and the spaces we live, work and interact in. The words ‘efficiency’, ‘innovation’ and ‘sustainability’ are often heard to inspire this change but what about transforming our lives in unimaginable ways? With the incredible advancement and availability of technology, we can also explore these exciting ‘what ifs’. Join Yewande Akinola as she offers thoughts that challenge the norm and presents ideas that can chart wild imaginations to achievable solutions.

About the speaker

Yewande Akinola is a young,environmental engineer with a passion for designing low energy buildings and sustainable water supplies. Having trained in engineering design, she works in low energy, low maintenance technologies, especially for developing countries.

In 2012, Yewande was awarded the title 'Young Engineer of the Year' by the Society of Public Health Engineers and 'IET Young Woman Engineer of the Year' by the Institute of Engineering and Technology. She has also taken to TV screens presenting programmes about engineering.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+
  • 14-15

Admission

£17

Website

http://rigb.org/whats-on/events-2015/june/public-re-engineering-our-spaces-fed

Teenagers building a robot

Royal Institution Summer Schools 2015

  • 27 July — 28 August 2015

This summer the Royal Institution has an action-packed programme of fun, hands-on educational activities for everyone aged seven and older.

From half day and full day workshops to week long courses running for five weeks from 27 July to 28 August, our range of innovative and interactive Summer Schools are designed to bring to life all areas of science, mathematics, computing and engineering. With over 70 sessions to choose from, covering topics from climate change to acoustics, earthquakes to rocket science, forensics, crash-testing and ancient history there is something for everyone.

The workshops in the L’Oréal Young Scientist Centreoffer students the chance to be a scientist for the day by making explosive bath bombs, extracting their own DNA, investigating forensic science, exploring the chemistry of colour and much more.

In the workshops and Summer Schools devised by the Ri’s Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering Masterclasses team and led by experts from across industry and academia, students can design and build their own underwater robots, have a go at computer coding and mathematical origami, or even try their hand at some 3D printing.

Booking is now open and places can be booked online via the Ri’s What’s On calendar or by calling our Public Programme team on 020 7409 2992.

Suitable for

  • 7-10
  • 14-15
  • 18+
  • 11-13
  • 16-17

Website

http://www.rigb.org/about/news/summer-2015/summer-schools-2015

The Royal Institution
The Royal Institution of Great Britain
21 Albemarle Street
Mayfair
London
Greater London
W1S 4BS
England

Website

www.rigb.org

E-mail

ri@ri.ac.uk

Telephone

020 7409 2992

Fax

+44 (0) 20 7670 2920

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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