Fashion and Textile Museum

Exterior photo of Fashion and Textile Museum
Food icon Guided tours icon Shop icon Wheelchair access icon

The Fashion and Textile Museum is a cutting edge centre for contemporary fashion, textiles and jewellery in London. Founded by iconic British designer Zandra Rhodes, the centre showcases a programme of changing exhibitions exploring elements of fashion, textile and jewellery as well as the Academy which runs courses for creative students and businesses.

Situated in the heart of fashionable Bermondsey Village, in a fantastic building designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta, the FTM aims not just to display and collect items relating to fashion, jewellery and textile design, but to offer inspiration to a new generation of creatives. Now redeveloped and operated by Newham College, the museum is a hub of learning, ideas and networking for the fashion and jewellery industry.

Venue Type:

Museum, Gallery

Opening hours

Tuesday – Saturday, 11.00am – 6.00pm
Thursdays 11.00am - 20.00pm
Sundays 11.00am - 17.00pm
Last admission 45 minutes before closing time

Admission charges

Adults £8.80, Concessions £6.60, Students £5.50.
Under 12s free entry

Discounts

  • National Art Pass
  • International Council of Museums
  • Museums Association
Getting there

London Underground: London Bridge on the Northern and Jubilee Lines.
Due to roadworks in the London Bridge area, please use the Tooley Street exit from the station. Bermondsey Street turns off Tooley Street to the right.

Mainline Rail: London Bridge

Additional info

All areas of the FTM are accessible by level access or by lift. Wheelchair accessible toilets are located on the ground floor of the Museum.

Collection details

Costume and Textiles, Design

Key artists and exhibits

  • The Glamour of Bellville Sassoon: 20th September 2013 - 11th January 2014
  • Artist Textiles Matisse to Warhol: 31st January - 17th May 2014
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
FTM

Jazz Age Gin Tasting

  • 17 November 2016 6-8pm

When the United States banned the making and drinking of alcohol in 1920, gin became ‘the’ alcohol of the Roaring Twenties. Yet, in contrast to the ‘bathtub’ spirits of the prohibition era, 21st century gin is made by master-distillers with artisan processes, quality and character. At the Fashion and Textile Museum we are privileged to work on a street with its own artisan tonic water. BTW – aka Bermondsey Tonic Water – specifically created to marry with the exciting range of botanicals used in modern gin. If most high street tonics are synthetic and sweet ‘BTW’ is dry, refreshing and allows the full flavour of each gin to be appreciated.

Greeted with a classic Gin & Tonic on arrival, you are invited to step back in time to see the life of a fashionable 1920s ‘bright young thing’. After being guided through the exhibition, you will be joined in the Fashion Studio by the BTW team for a gin flight-tasting and talk. The flight tasting involves three mini G&Ts all named with tasting notes but in an unknown order. Try them all, make a guess as to what’s what & then put yourself out of your misery by opening your sealed envelope to reveal which is which. With BTW, identifying the gins is easier than you may think!

There will be two talks and tastings during the evening at 6.15pm and 7pm. Please select the time of your tasting when booking. The exhibition 1920s Jazz Age Fashion & Photographs can be viewed throughout the evening until 8pm.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Admission

£35 single ticket / £60 double ticket includes Gin & Tonic on arrival, exhibition entry and gin flight-tasting. This event is for adults over 18 only

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/jazz-age-gin-tasting/

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
savoyhotel

Art Deco Architecture in London

  • 30 September 2016 From 11:30am, From 12:15pm

With the birth of the automobile industry, the Hollywood film industry, and the rise of modern retail, the early 20th century saw a new language of design and new types of buildings commissioned to reflect changes in popular culture. This illustrated talk highlights some of the best examples of 1920s and 1930s Art Deco architecture to see in Central London.

A wonderful complement to the current exhibition 1920s Jazz Age Fashion & Photographs, Pucci gives a taste of the sharp angles and ‘ocean liner’ curves mirrored in the architecture of the period, from cinemas and hotels to garages and shops. This talk is a must for all fans of Jazz Age architecture and can be enhanced by booking one of Pucci’s walking tours. For more information on Art Deco Architecture walking tours please visit londonunravelled.com

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 14-15
  • 16-17

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Admission

Free talk with exhibition entry

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/free-art-deco-architecture-in-london/

FTM

JAMES ABBE Photographer of the Jazz Age

  • 7 October 2016 From 11:30am

At this free* talk, Pepper celebrates the work of this master 20th century photographer and presents new insights on James Abbe’s approach to fashion photography and celebrity portraiture. Abbe (1883–1973) began his career in New York, moving to Paris in the 1920s. He produced many iconic images from the world of entertainment, making portraits in his studio and on location for key movies and stage productions featuring Lillian Gish, Dorothy Gish and Fred and Adele Astaire. Other fashion studies show Gilda Gray, the Dolly Sisters and Louise Brooks. Pepper outlines how the selection of photographs on display was made, and draws parallels with the work of other photographers featured in the main exhibition of Jazz Age Fashion.

Terence Pepper is a Photo Curator and Exhibition Organiser. He wrote the definitive biography of James Abbe, The Lure of the Limelight (1995), for the National Portrait Gallery, London where he worked as Curator of Photographs for 40 years. His award-winning exhibitions and publications include Vanity Fair Portraits (2008), Beaton: Portraits (2004), Man Ray Portraits (2013) and most recently Audrey Hepburn Portraits of an Icon (2015).

*Free talk with exhibition entry

Suitable for

  • Any age
  • 16-17
  • 18+
  • 14-15

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/free-james-abbe-photographer-of-the-jazz-age/

FTM

AN AIR OF ABANDON 1920s Hair & Beauty

  • 20 October 2016 6-8pm

The 1920s encompasses not only the creation of the modern cosmetics and beauty industry, but also the power of the movies to shape taste and behaviour. Access to stockings, shoes and cosmetics, as well as to magazines that documented the latest trends, contributed to an extraordinary shift in women’s opportunities to explore and express themselves. The time had come for many women to have their hair cut short, but what shaped the transformative club-cut or Eton crop? Why was the ‘bob’ so revolutionary? And, why are so many of us still intrigued by this era’s elegance? Is it simply because it is a decade that’s easy to recreate on screen? Join us at this talk in which Caroline Cox considers the beauty influences that shaped the Jazz Age, focusing on the rebellious and transformative bob haircut; and Maggie Norden shares her interest in Screen Style, with specific reference to some remarkable women pioneers and their modes of ‘fun’.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Admission

Price £15 / £12 students includes a complimentary drink and exhibition entry.

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/an-air-of-abandon-1920s-hair-beauty/

FTM

Fashion Writing: The Real Issues

  • 27 October 2016 6-8pm

Fashion journalism first flourished in the 1920s as a new breed of writers, photographers and editors catered to an eager consumer audience. Publications such as The New Yorker, Tatler, Vanity Fair and Vogue, among others, forged distinctive approaches to writing about style and imbued the industry with intelligence, energy and glamour. Almost a century later, fashion writing touches all elements of the media. Stories about the business of fashion, as well as the celebrities who promote it, are regularly profiled on the front page of national newspapers as well as in specialist journals and magazines. The opportunities to publish have also increased, with new platforms in print, broadcast and online media. But is there any truth behind stereotypes portrayed in films such as The Devil Wears Prada? And, what are the elements that make the perfect story?

Join us at this panel discussion exploring the realities of fashion journalism today and how the fashion magazine environment might develop in the 21st century. Forget the clichés and hear what it’s really like working for some of the biggest glossy magazines, in-house publications and new content aggregators. In an honest debate about their personal experiences and careers, the panellists will explain how they entered the industry, the reality of their day to day work and how future developments might unfold.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Admission

Price £15 / £12 students includes a complimentary drink and exhibition entry.

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/fashion-writing-the-real-issues/

FTM

1920s Jazz Dancing Workshop

  • 9 November 2016 2:30-4:30pm

Hear how the Charleston dance craze swept across the United States in the 1920s in the introductory talk, then learn to shimmy, and shake to the hot jazz of the day. Wear your best 1920s outfits if you can and help us recreate the dance hall experience and the devil-may-care attitude of the roaring jazz age dances.

14.30: Hot & Sweet: 1920s music & dance
14.45: Charleston dance class
15.45: Tea or coffee
16.00: Talk on dance on stage & screen in the 1920s, with a few final moves.
16.30: Ends

The exhibition 1920s Jazz Age Fashion & Photographs can be viewed before or after the class.
Introductory level. No previous experience required.

Nikki Santilli is a vintage jazz dancer and teacher specialising in the swing dances of the 1920s to 1940s, from Charleston to Bebop. She has over 10 years’ experience teaching jazz roots to individuals and community groups in London.

Suitable for

  • 11-13
  • 16-17
  • 14-15
  • 18+

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Admission

£35 single ticket / £60 double ticket includes tea and coffee plus exhibition ticket

Website

http://1920s Jazz Dancing Workshop

FTM

The Savoy Hotel in the Jazz Age

  • 25 November 2016 From 11:30am

Since its foundation, by theatrical impresario Richard D’Oyly Carte in 1889, The Savoy has embraced the latest in technology and entertainment: it was the first hotel lit by electricity and the first with electric lifts. Yet it was after the First World War that The Savoy pioneered dancing in the large restaurants, along with air conditioning, steam-heating, soundproofed windows, 24-hour room service and telephones in every bathroom. The British premiere of Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin was broadcast from The Savoy in 1925 and the dance bands at the hotel became some of the most renowned in Europe.

Suitable for

  • Any age
  • 16-17
  • 18+
  • 14-15

Where

Fashion & Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
SE1 3XF

Website

http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-whats-on/free-the-savoy-hotel-in-the-jazz-age/

Getting there

London Underground: London Bridge on the Northern and Jubilee Lines.
Due to roadworks in the London Bridge area, please use the Tooley Street exit from the station. Bermondsey Street turns off Tooley Street to the right.

Mainline Rail: London Bridge

Fashion and Textile Museum
83 Bermondsey Street
London
Greater London
SE1 3XF
England

Website

www.ftmlondon.org

E-mail

info@ftmlondon.org

Telephone

020 7407 8664

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
advertisement