Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum - Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums

Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum - Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Buddle Street
Wallsend
Tyne and Wear
NE28 6HR
England

Website

www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum

E-mail

info@segedunumromanfort.org.uk

Telephone

0191 278 4217

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Segedunum Roman Fort and Baths
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In AD122 the Emperor Hadrian ordered a mighty frontier system to be built across Britain to defend the Roman Empire from the barbarians to the North.

The result was Hadrian's Wall, a 73 mile barrier stretching from the River Tyne in the east to the Solway Firth in the west. Segedunum, which means ‘Strong Fort’, was built to guard the eastern end of the Wall, and housed 600 Roman soldiers. It stood for almost 300 years as a symbol of Roman rule and a bastion against barbarian attack.

Today, Segedunum is once again a major site on Hadrian's Wall. It is the most excavated fort along the Wall with surviving foundations of many buildings and part of the Wall itself. There is a large interactive museum plus full-scale reconstructions of a bath house and a section of Wall. The 35 metre high viewing tower provides outstanding views across this World Heritage Site.

Venue Type:

Heritage site, Archaeological site, Museum

Opening hours

Now until 31 March 2015 - open weekdays Monday – Friday 10.00am – 2.30pm then hours will increse in the spring.

Special Winter Saturday - 7 March 2015 open 10am – 2.30pm

Café & shop open from 8.45am (and from 9.45am on on our Special Winter Saturday 7 March 2015)

Admission charges

Children free (16 years & under)
Adults £5.50
Concessions (over 60 years and students with a valid student card) £3.50

The Roman collections at Segedunum relate to the more recent excavations of the 1970s, 80s and 90s, and are constantly being augmented by fresh archaeological fieldwork in the Wallsend area. Their particular significance lies in the fact that they represent a comparatively comprehensive span of both the 300 year occupation of the site, and of the assorted structures within it. Several items deserve particular mention, including the only stone toilet seat from Roman Britain, and a collection of rounded stones, defensive missiles for the Fort. The Industry Gallery has artefacts associated with local coalmining, including a series of safety lamps, and shipbuilding. The shipbuilding displays include several ship models such as the Carpathia, and a champagne launcher from Swan Hunter shipyard.

Collection details

Archaeology

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Workers at the Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Company repairing torpedo damage to the troop transport ss Huntsend in 1917

Coal, Ships and Zeppelins: North Tyneside in the First World War

  • 31 July 2014 — 26 April 2015 *on now

Ships had to be built, engined and repaired if the war was to be won, and the shipyards and engine works of North Tyneside rose to the challenge. But both shipyard and coal mine also had to overcome labour shortages as many of their best workers rushed to join up and fight the enemy. This thought-provoking exhibition uses ship models and other museum collections together with photographs, documents and film to tell the story of the people of North Tyneside. The exhibition also features the remains of an incendiary bomb dropped on Wallsend during the Zeppelin raid of April 14th 1915.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Adults £5.50
Concessions (over 60 years and students with a valid student card) £3.50
Children free (16 years & under)

The Viewing Tower

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The centrepiece of Segedunum is a 35 metre high viewing tower, which gives stunning views of the excavated Fort and the surrounding area.

Set against this dramatic backdrop, watch 2,000 years of history unfold as an amazing computer generated story chronicles the changes at Wallsend from Roman times and the building of the Fort to the growth of heavy industry on the River Tyne.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/displays/the-viewing-tower.html

The Roman Gallery

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

Discover what life at the Fort was like for the soldiers who lived there and explore the methods that archaeologists have used to uncover Segedunum's secrets.

The centre of the Roman gallery is remodelled on the courtyard of the original Fort's headquarters building. It contains a superbly detailed model of Segedunum and an interactive virtual tour of the Fort which allows individual buildings to be explored in more detail. The gallery also has a reconstruction of a cavalry barrack, and displays focusing on the Commanding Officer's house, the granary and the hospital.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/displays/the-roman-gallery.html

Strong Place

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

This new display reveals the unusual story of the landscape at Segedunum. Over nearly 2,000 years the site has been shaped by huge changes. Romans, coal mining and shipbuilding have all left their mark on this land and created the mix we see today.

Visual displays, interactives and audio points explore the fascinating story of this landscape, its value and its use.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/displays/strong-place.html

Hadrian's Wall Segedunum

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

An 80-metre section of original remains of Hadrian's Wall, standing eight courses high in places, can also be seen to the west of Segedunum. A reconstructed section of the wall, which gives an impression of how it may have looked 1,800 years ago, stands beside the actual line of the original Wall.

Archaeologists working on the remains were surprised to find that the world famous Wall had collapsed, in spectacular fashion, during the Roman period. The collapse was most likely to have been caused by the washing away or the slumping of the ground beneath it. The section of the Wall is unique, as it is the highest surviving section of Hadrian's Wall on view to the public in Tyneside.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/displays/hadrian-039-s-wall-segedunum.html

Excavated Remains

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The remains at Segedunum represent one of the most completely excavated forts anywhere in the Roman Empire.

The ground plan shows the Fort as it would have been laid out in AD 200. The walls and gateways, granary stores, soldiers' barrack blocks, Commanding Officer's house and headquarters, and more unusually a hospital, have been consolidated.

The entire plan of the Fort has been laid out so that visitors can walk around it with ease and those looking down on it from the viewing tower can fully appreciate the Fort's layout.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/displays/excavated-remains.html

Roman Empire: Power and People

  • 30 May — 13 September 2015

Roman Empire: Power and People brings together over 160 stunning pieces from the British Museum to explore the story of one of the most powerful empires the world has ever seen.

Highlights include sculpture from the villas of the Emperors Tiberius and Hadrian, coins from the famous Hoxne treasure, beautiful jewellery and even near-perfectly preserved children’s clothing from Roman Egypt.

The exhibition explores the wealth, power and organisation of the Empire, but also how the Romans viewed their provinces and other peoples. Religious, military and personal objects give an insight into the lives of people across the Empire, from northern Britain to Egypt and the Middle East. These fascinating objects show how the influences of the many people and places that the Romans came into contact with were absorbed and adapted into the Empire.

A British Museum UK Partners touring exhibition.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/exhibitions

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Workers at the Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Company repairing torpedo damage to the troop transport ss Huntsend, 1917

Coal, Ships and Zeppelins: North Tyneside in the First World War - Exhibition Tour

  • 5 March 2015 1-2pm

Join Curator Ian Whitehead to discover what life was like in North Tyneside during the First World War.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£2

Image of the HMS Viper

Parsons Marine Steam Turbines: From Destroyers to Dreadnoughts 1898 - 1918

  • 11 April 2015 11am-12:30pm

Double talk by Geoff Horseman, Chief Turbine Engineer at Siemens and the keeper of the historic archive at the CA Parsons Works in Newcastle.

K Class Submarines: the Suicide Club
In 1913, it was decided to build submarines which were fast enough to keep pace with surface ships. These were powered by steam turbines to produce sufficient power and they were as large as modern nuclear submarines. The engines were a success but the submarines were an ill-conceived design in other regards. In this short talk, Geoff will describe the series of accidents and mishaps which led to these submarines becoming known as the ‘Kalamity Class’ and the ‘Suicide Club’.

Parsons Marine Steam Turbines: From Destroyers to Dreadnoughts 1898 - 1918
This talk will look at the evolution of the Parsons steam turbine for naval duty up to 1918. After the success of Turbinia, steam turbines were quickly adopted as the main engines for the fastest and most powerful ships in the navies of all major industrialised countries. This talk will describe how Parsons turbines evolved from rudimentary direct drive engines of 2,000hp to multi-cylinder geared turbines producing up to 100,000hp capable of propelling the largest battleships of WW1.

Admission

£4, free for students

Website

http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/segedunum-roman-fort/whats-on/events/parsons-marine-steam-turbines-from-destroyers-to-dreadnoughts-1898-1918.html

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