The Battle of Bannockburn Visitor Centre

The Battle of Bannockburn Visitor Centre
Glasgow Road
Stirling
Stirling and Falkirk
FK7 0LJ
Scotland

Website

http://www.battleofbannockburn.com/

E-mail

bannockburn@nts.org.uk

Telephone

0844 493 2139

Fax

0844 493 2138

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Construction begins on new Battle of Bannockburn visitor centre
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Bannockburn is the battlefield site where the fate of Scotland as a nation would turn. Here, on 23 and 24 June 1314, Robert the Bruce gathered his men to take on the professional army of King Edward II of England. Despite facing a greater number of troops, Bruce chose his ground wisely and trained his men to use it to their best advantage. The result was a rout of King Edward’s forces and a victory that would ultimately mean freedom for Scotland from the threat of oppressive English rule.

The Battle of Bannockburn has become one of the greatest and most important pitched battles ever fought in the British Isles. A turning point in the history of both Scotland and England, the battle had very significant medium and long-term effects.

Bannockburn was the key battle in what are now known as the Scottish Wars of Independence: battles fought by the Scots against successive acquisitive English kings and between rival claimants for the kingship of Scotland.

Bannockburn is arguably the most famous battle to be fought and won by the Scots in Scotland, but it is widely acknowledged to be more than that— it continues to conjure up ideas of freedom, independence, patriotism, heroism, perseverance, and triumph against overwhelming odds.

Bannockburn has inspired many works of art and literature, such as Robert Burns’s ‘Scots Wha Hae’ or the more recent ‘Flower of Scotland’ by Roy Williamson of the Corries.

Venue Type:

Museum, Heritage site

Opening hours

Exhibition and shops
March and October: 10am to 5pm (last entry to the exhibition at 4.15pm)
April to September: 10am to 5.30pm (last entry to the exhibition at 4.45pm)
November to February: Group bookings available on request.

Admission charges

Adult: £6.00
Concessions: £5.00
Child: £5.00
Family (2 adults + 4 Children): £15.50
Single Adult Family (1 adult + 4 children): £10.50
Adult Group: £5.00ea
School Group: £2.50ea
Includes Film, Exhibition and try-on Armour/Clothing.

Discounts

  • National Trust
Getting there

By road: From the M9: leave at J9-Stirling Services, Follow the A872 for approx 1 mile, Heritage centre on left on the brow of the hill. From the centre of Stirling, head towards the M9 signposted Glasgow-Edinburgh- Services, approxx 3 miles from the centre of Stirling.

By Bus: No's 24, X39, 54 all take you past the Heritage Centre.

Collection details

Archaeology, Weapons and War

Key artists and exhibits

  • The Centre contains an exhibition on the period of the battle, and an audio-visual presentation.

Getting there

By road: From the M9: leave at J9-Stirling Services, Follow the A872 for approx 1 mile, Heritage centre on left on the brow of the hill. From the centre of Stirling, head towards the M9 signposted Glasgow-Edinburgh- Services, approxx 3 miles from the centre of Stirling.

By Bus: No's 24, X39, 54 all take you past the Heritage Centre.

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